Mark Mosher Bio & Artistic Statement

Mark Mosher
Synthesist, Electronic Musician, and Multimedia Artist

BIO
Mark Mosher is a synthesist, electronic musician, live visualist and multimedia artist from Boulder, Colorado who composes and improvises original music spanning from experimental cinematic soundscapes to techno. He has released 19 recordings over the last 12 years.

He has been invited to perform at concerts and festivals around the country such as Electro-Music New York, Electro-Music Asheville (NC), Pacific Northwest Synthfest, The Art Institute of Sunnyvale California, and the Guthman Musical Instrument Competition at the Georgia Tech School of Music.

Locally, he has had the honor of performing for the City of Denver at SynSunday: Doors Open Denver, the Denver Central Library, the Boulder Dairy Arts Center, the Lafayette Electronic Arts Festival [LEAF], as a special guest with the CU Boulder Laptop Orchestra [BLOrk], at DU for the grand opening of the Emergent Digital Practices program’s Performance Black Box, and as part of a group called the Carbon Dioxide Ensemble at a music convocation for the Lamont School of Music.

Checkout some buzz from past shows.

Mark has been helping foster the local arts community since 2012 as the founder of the Rocky Mountain Synthesizer Meet through which he has hosted over 110 free events, workshops, and concerts.

ARTISTIC STATEMENT

My fascination for electronic music began as a child watching sci-fi films such as The Day the Earth Stood Still, which featured the Theremin, and Forbidden Planet, which featured the groundbreaking electronic tonalities of Louis and Bebe Barron. Tangerine Dream’s amazing soundtrack to the film Sorcerer opened my mind to using synthesizers to incorporate cinematic arcs into instrumental electronic music. Through Kraftwerk, I discovered how synthesizers could be used for melodic and beat-driven popular music. Through Pierre Schaeffer, I learned the possibilities of musique concrète techniques to incorporate and manipulate recorded sounds as raw material for new sounds. 

All of this has informed my current show, Live Sci-Fi Themes, where I explore ways to use technology to do in real-time what it would have taken these pioneers 100s of hours to do in the studio. Performances include a mix of instrumental cinematic ambient and beat-driven music.

My approach with each show is to fashion an expressive and performative “musical rig”. The “rig’ is the instrument and is made up of four facets – sound generators, effects, instrumentalities, and live arrangement. 

For sound generators I use a combination of oscillator-based synths, granular synths, and samplers. Examples of effects might be reverb, beat slicers, bit crushers, loopers, and delays. For instrumentalities, I utilize expressive MIDI controllers such as keyboards, pads, gesture controllers, multi-touch, and MPE controllers for advanced MIDI Polyphonic Expression. The rig also has devices that allow me to do live arrangement, sequencing, looping, live sampling, and arpeggiation – as well as the ability to save and change the “state” of the rig in-flight.

For each performance I prepare a palette of original sounds, presets, and patterns as a starting point. From there I play, improvise, and arrange the show as I go.