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(Mark Mosher Music News) Announcements Music Single

New Single and Video: “Space-Time Distortion Near Track Number 8”

Story:

I discovered a space-time distortion while visiting Chicago. The location of the anomaly is at track 8 at Union Station.

Get The Single Watch the Video

I published this new song as a single on Bandcamp.

I also made a live studio recording of the session then edited this into a super trippy video which you can watch on YouTube.

Artist Notes:

This audio and video was captured in one real-time pass to a Zoom Q4N Digital Recorder. The primary source video for 90% of the visuals is from the overhead view of the live studio session. The only other footage is a video field recording from Chicago’s Union Station also recorded on the Zoom Q4N. The audio was not edited when I added video effects in post.

The audio field recording was extracted the Zoom Q4N video shot at Union Station. It’s mangled pretty heavily in this piece put if you listen closely, you can hear an automated voice informing you that you are at track 8 and 10. Interestingly, the speakers at the station are not directional and the audio is at different loop lengths – so just wandering about between these gates is a trippy polyrhythmic treat.

Instrumentation and Instrumentalities:

The piece is a combination of live sequencing and live performance. The Octatrack is used to host drum samples and recording. It is also used to MIDI sequence 3 synth slots on the Nord Lead 4 including MIDI automation. I perform live using all 4 slots on the Nord plus manipulate the Octatrack in real-time. Lots of real-time sound design and morphing. All the groovy synth sounds are exclusive to Nord Lead 4 all being created in real-time (meaning no synth audio was pre-recorded).

Categories
(Modulate This) Octatrack Sound Design

Elektron Octatrack MII vs Octatrack MKI – A Deeper Look Beyond the Bullet Points

[update 2017-11-01 The New OS is Here!!! Here is a new post on what’s new with a link do the download.]

This rather lengthy post offers a comparison of the original Octatrack vs the Octatrack MKII from my perspective as a long-time Octatrack user. [Update 2017-10-07] The MKII has release and the manual is online here. While I wrote this article in July info below is still helpful. I’ll offer an update post on the new OS once it releases and I install it. The PDF manual isn’t online yet and I wanted to get beyond the marketing bullet points so I swapped some messages with Elektron support (excellent responses and response times btw) to get clarifications on some of the new features. I’ll also offer some thoughts on what the MKII means for existing and new users as well as some tips.

My History with the Octatrack

I’ve been working with the Octatrack for over 4 years. It is the cornerstone of my hardware rig and my primary instrument for my improvisational solo work and for my collaborations with the (no)poem, and A.I. Winter. The Octatrack was also featured heavily on my recent studio release Sonic Encounters Volume 01 and for the singles “It Doesn’t Have to Hate Us to Use Our Molecules” and the recent “Space-Time Distortion Near Track Number 8“. I also like to use the Octatrack to emulate exotic instruments like the Swarmatron.

I’ve written about the Octatrack on Modulate This! using the category https://modulatethis.com/category/octatrack/.  I’ve also had the pleasure to teach other artist how to make music and perform with the Octatrack.

My favorite (and perhaps most unusual) use for the Octatrack is with the Denver’s Carbon Dioxide Ensemble with Copper Heartist Thomas Lundy and Theremist Victoria Lundy. I use the Octatrack to process and live sample Tom’s copper heart play played with dry ice build sample based instruments on the fly. In other words real-time Musique concrète. Here is a short behind-the-scenes and performance snippet video.

 

For more, check out this playlist on my YouTube channel which feature the Octatrack.

My most recent work with the Octatrack was for my single “Space-Time Distortion Near Track Number 8” (available on bandcamp). Here is a video of the piece.

The primary source video for 90% of the visuals is from the overhead view of the live studio session. It’s mangled pretty heavily in this piece put if you listen closely, you can hear an automated voice informing you that you are at track 8 and 10. Interestingly, the speakers at the station are not directional and the audio is at different loop lengths – so just wandering about between these gates is a trippy polyrhythmic treat. The piece is a combination of live sequencing and live performance. The Octatrack is used to host drum samples and recording. It is also used to MIDI sequence 3 synth slots on the Nord Lead 4 including MIDI automation.

Octatrack MKII is a Mechanical Upgrade

 

 

According to Elektron support the MKII is a mechanical upgrade. They needed to change out some components (they didn’t mention which ones) that were end of life. Since they needed to do some redesign to accommodate the new parts, they also took the time to upgraded the mechanics and some other parts within machine plus add more buttons to the panel.

The redesign to add the Digitakt-style buttons and encoders, more buttons,  plus the update of Audio-In to balanced inputs make this more than simply a hardware guts and cosmetic refresh.

Operating System & Data Storage are the Same on Octatrack MKII and MKI

Elektron support verified the operating systems are the same.

For those who aren’t familiar with the Octatrack,  one of the best things about it from a backup and data management perspective is that system config information is stored in the individual projects end therefore there are no external dependencies.  If your move your card to another machine and turn it on, this other Octatrack becomes your Octatrack. If your machine breaks, move the card to a friend’s machine – done. No drivers, no missing VSTs, no missing files.

In the MKII specs, they indicate “Fully compatible with Octatrack MKI projects/data“. Since the OS is the same and the MKII still uses Compact Flash, this is NOT an import. It means you can work natively with your project data on Compact Flash cards on either a MKI or MKII and move the cards back and forth.

[update 2017-07-05] For clarity, I’m including my questions and responses from Elektron on the OS.

Q: I saw this in the specs “Fully compatible with Octatrack MKI projects/data”. So this implies I can open MKI files on a MKII. I’m hoping I can also open projects I create on a MKII with my MKI so I can use the MKI as a backup. Is project data compatibility work both directions?

A: Elektron Support – 
They will run the same software – the MKII is a mechanical upgrade and has the same features and OS as the MKI.

Q: Elektron announced Octatrack was “Feature Complete” on the OS side a while back. Will you start developing new features for both machines again?

A: Elektron Support – We have nothing to comment on OS features at this time. We will however address some bugs and issues – which will benefit both MKI and MKII users since they use the same OS.

Same OS, same data format, and same storage format means the next paragraph still holds true unless at some point they fork the code or change the data formats. 

The upside of all this for existing owners is that if you buy a MKII, you could use the MKI as a backup or for a dual-deck setup without having to mess around with import/export and be concerned about feature parity.

[update 2017-10-07] As anticipated, the MKII shipped with some new features which will also work in the MKI as they are in fact running the same OS. Elektron has not posted the OS yet, but the support page has a notice that it’s coming soon.

I scanned the MKII manual and it looks like Conditional Locks and Fill Mode is in the future for us MKI owners :^)

ot-mki-os-update

New/Re-Purposed Backlit Buttons and New LEDs

While the operating system under the hood is the same, the user experience has been enhanced by “Increased amount of dedicated buttons enabling quicker workflow”. The buttons are described as “Ultra durable back-lit buttons. Rated for 50 million presses”. These buttons add new affordances for tasks that used to require menu diving or more complex shift-presses include:

  • AED/Slice Grid – AED (which I assume stand for “Audio Editor”) get’s it’s own button – yay! On MKI you access the audio editor by pressing [TRACK]+[Bank/Edit] which isn’t the most obvious button sequence in the world. So much so that I find when I’m giving lessons on the Octatrack that many people don’t even know the OT has an audio editor :^0. So this is a biggie. Slice to Grid is also a tab interface from there on MKI – which is quite a few steps away from how it’s surfaced on the MKII. Excellent!
  • PROJ/Save Proj button – this was burried in [FUNCTION]+[Mixer/Project].
  • MIX/Click– There was already a mix button, and because Project has been surfaced as it’s own button, the shift function is assigned to Click settings. You used to have to use  [CUE] + [TEMPO] to toggle click (assuming you had metronome configured to “Active”).
  • PART/Part Edit – a click instead of a shift-press with access to part editing as the shift-press.
  • MIDI/MIDI Sync – MIDI was a dedicated button, but it’s Function shift mode was “Part”. Now that Part has it’s own button, MIDI Sync has been surfaced as a function-press.
  • ARR/Arr Mode – Arranger get’s it’s own button. BTW did you know you can set different tempos per pattern in arranger? Yes it’s true! The “B” parameter is for BPM.
  • PTN/Pattern Settings – Pattern has it’s own button on the MKI so that’s not new. Since Arrange has it’s own button now, the shift-function of PTN is now Pattern Settings.
  • REC3 –  Earlier available in the REC setup menu for internal resampling.
  • -Int- – Two new LEDs for monitoring the resampling input level.

Button Brightness

The back-lit buttons look plenty bright when you watch Digitakt videos. Just the same, I asked Elektron support:

Q: Question about Octatrack MKII back-lit button brightness. Do you find that if you were using the MKII in daylight that the button states expressed as color are more or less visible than the MKI LEDs? Not direct sunlight, but say under a tent at a festival in the daytime.

A: The lit area is larger, and the lighting is a tad brighter – so the new buttons (same as Digitakt) should be more visible in a very bright environment.

New and Improved Labeling

The button naming convention has changed with the label for the primary function being all upper case now. New labels have been added on to the panel for the shift functions to reveal some [FUNCTION] presses that were already there or to make the function more obvious. This will help shorten the learning curve a bit. They include:

  • Arrow Keys  – Trig mode and nudge. Tip: Trig mode is how you set trigs work operation for real-time performance. Possibilities are TRACKS, CHROMATIC, SLOTS, SLICES, QUICK MUTE, DELAY CONTROL.
  • Yes/No – labels for arm and disarm (ex. rearm a one-shot)
  • Cue/Reload Part – used to say just “Reload”. Reload what? The “Part” of course.
  • A-F Encoders  – New labels for audio editing control…Start Position, Loop Position, End Position, Zoom up/down, Scroll left/right, Zoom left/right. Holy shit is this helpful! I’ve been using the machine 4 years and I sometimes get still confused with this set of controls – haha.
  • Tap Tempo/Pickup Sync – There was a tempo button before. It opened up the Tempo page so you could adjust tempo with an encoder. Tap tempo was achieved by holding [FUNCTION] then tapping tempo. I assume (as I don’t have the manual yet) that pressing Tap will bring up the Tempo page and tapping it will do Tap Tempo – more immediate and obvious than the MKI. [update 2017-07-05] [FUNCTION]+press is still serves pickup Sync a new function-press and the labeling properly reflects this.
  • Level – has a sub-label for Cursor position – in case you didn’t realize the level button was your data scroll control. Tip: Holding [FUNCTION] when turning Level allows you to adjust your Master Volume.
  • REC1/REC2 – now has handy labels for pickup machine overdub, play/stop.

OLED Display

“A crisp OLED screen with fantastic viewing angles.” In the picture the black and white are inverted for my high-contrast viewing – like Digitakt. Looks pretty great. Both machine’s specs say the screen dimensions are 128×64.

Better Encoders

I felt the MKI encoders were great. Seems like these are even better. Tip: Turning an encoder offers fine control. Press [FUNCTION] and turn offers more gross control over a parameter, and if appropriate will snap you to virtual detents, For example, if you hold [FUNCTION] and turn the knob for pan Balance, the value will snap Left (-64), Center (0), and Right (+64). If hold [FUNCTION] and turn a know when setting a sample position you will snap to a zero crossing.

New Crossfader

The MKI spec is “Infinium optical crossfader”. The MKII spec says “Contactless silky smooth performance crossfader”. I verified that this is a new component  as the older Infinum is no longer manufactured. According to Elektron, “the throw are a few mm shorter and the friction is a bit lighter.”

Power Supple Change

[Update 2017-07-05] Alvaro Villalobos on facebook pointed out that the power supply changed. MKI is 6V DC 3A positive tip. MKII is 12VDC 2A poitive tiop. Label those power supplies!

Better Audio In

The MKI already had 4 × 1/4″ impedance balanced audio out jacks. The the audio in’s where not balanced. The MKII hardware offers an upgrade to the external inputs so they are impedance balanced as well.

No Overbrdige

No Overbridge support. This makes sense now that I know its the MK1 and MKII share the same OS. Personally this is not a show stopper for me. I use the Octatrack when I’m not using Ableton Live. I use it because I don’t want to be on a computer. There it is.

The End Result – Surfacing More Features with Quicker Workflow While Shorting the Learning Curve

At quick glance all this doesn’t look very different, but when you look deeper you can see a lot of design went into improving the UX and hardware to surface more features with quicker workflow. All this will help shorten the learning curve as well. I for one know that the update will have me using more features in real-time that were burred a few clicks away. I could see using features such as resampleing and slicing – which I used in the studio – more in performance.

Overall, it’s pretty great Elektrton could overlay all that on top of the same OS!

What’s In It for Existing Octatrack Users

Think iPad Upgrade

Getting an Octatrack MKII if you have a MKI is more like getting an iPad Pro 10.5 when you already have an iPad. You get a better screen, better mechanics, better stuff under the hood, better design, some new User Experience affordances, but the OS under-the-hood is the same OS. I suppose the analogy breaks down on things like processor speed, but you get the idea.

Your chops and data will transfer to the new machine – done. If you keep your old machine, it can act as a backup or 2-deck system since the OS is the same and you can swap cards back and forth. If you sell your old machine to a friend, you’ve just helped the community grow.

The OS “It’s Alive”- Again

There is another benefit to the MKI users even if they don’t buy a MKII. Until this announcement the Octatrack OS was “feature complete” – as in NO more updates. I asked Elektron support if they were planning updates. They said “nothing to comment on OS features at this time” but indicated if there were bug fixes it would benefit MKI and MKII since they use the same OS.

The release of MKII leaves the door open for fixes or issues where as before it was closed. Being ever the optimist, it seems possible that on the way to V2 they could sneak in features that the current hardware could support – say trig conditions.

What’s In it for New Octatrack Artists

Elektron Support’s take on this update is that…

“The Octatrack still stands as a unique and great instrument, this upgrade lets it continue being just that.”

I agree completely – and now the machine has new revitalized life for a new set of artists. Even considering Digitakt, the Octatrack MKII has a unique spot in the the Elektron lineup – and in the market.

Cheers to Elektron for Circling Back and Extending the Life a Fantastic Instrument

Elektron is a small company and I’d imagine creating new products like the Heat and the Digitakt required all-hands-on-deck for the past few years. It’s pretty cool (and extremely rare in the music tech industry) that a company would circle back and take a pass at getting a piece of hardware that first launched in January 2011 back into a producible and supportable form. Their strategy rewards loyal customers who worked to gain virtuosity with the instrument by extending the Octatrack’s life as well offering current Elektron build quality and features that those with newer products are used to. Smart.

I would much rather have this MKII update than to have waited 2 or 3 years for a V2 product. MKII has the potential to renew interest in the instrument which would help grow the Octatrack community building more support for a V2. [Update 2017-10-07] This is already happening and there are a flurry of new videos popping up on YouTube with folks showing off the MKII. It’s alive!

Octatrack MKII – A Machine that STILL Makes Music

I’ll leave you with the original and epic original Octatrack video.

Oh and Elektron, if you are reading this, now would be a great time to do another episode in the story with Hector with the new Octatrack MKII!

Thanks for Reading,
 
Mark Mosher
Boulder, CO

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Categories
(Modulate This) Concerts Events Festivals Musique concrète Octatrack Videos

Video: Carbon Dioxide Ensemble (CO2E) Live at Denver Noise Fest 2016

The Carbon Dioxide Ensemble (CO2E) had the honor of opening night 2 of the Denver Noise Fest 2016 on December 22nd, 2016 at Globe Hall. Here is a video of our performance.

As I mentioned in a recent post, the focus of our ensemble is on live improvisational performance of musique concrète. Thomas Lundy uses blocks for dry ice to cause the copper heart to vibrate (through rapid cooling, strikes, drags…). I then use the Elektron Octatrack dynamic performance sampler to live-sample the Tom’s performance via a contact mic on the copper heart. I then simultaneously performs and does real-time sound design with the captured audio. Victoria Lundy accompanies on Theremin and Reaktor.

Audio is from room via the Q4N video camera.

Rig Photos

Links:
CO2E: https://markmoshermusic.com/portfolio…
Denver Noise Fest: http://www.DenverNoiseFest.com

Categories
(Mark Mosher Music News) (Modulate This) A.I. Winter

Video of A.I. Winter Live Performance from Electro-Music NY 2014 Now Available

It’s been a while since I’ve done an update or a podcast or a live show.  I’ve been enjoying some travel, hanging with the family, riding bikes, hiking, walking, reading, and listening. I’ve also been spending time studio time to work on new ideas, making field recordings,  as well as running some events for the 480+ member strong Rocky Mountain Synthesizer Meetup.

In the meantime, I noticed that a live video has surfaced of my duo A.I. Winter with Michael O’Bannon. It’s the full video 27 minute of a live performance of “Instantiate” from Electro-Music NY 2014 festival on September 7th, 2014. A big thanks to Steve Mokris for recording and posting this!

“Instantiate” is an experimental ambient piece with four movements composed for two Octatracks.”

Watch The Full Performance Here

Note – I also did double-duty on visuals with live camera input. The concept is as the A.I. is watching us, and as it evolves things become more clear to it (and we know how that will end). Watch embedded video.

”From the barren nanoscapes inside our personal devices come furtive anthems hummed by those digital servants who will one day be our overlords…”.

Instantiate” is an en experimental ambient piece with four movements composed for two Octatracks.

Movement 1: Stasis – A still, slow moving “present time”. Drones and melodies with an occasional perturbation to foreshadow what is coming.

Movement 2: Stirrings – Bursts of brief intelligence and control come and go. Perturbations of a minimal but ominous atmosphere. These are simple at first, but evolve toward short periods of chaos that quickly burn out.

Movement 3: Birth – The A.I. begins to build and grow recursively. Structures surface and are repeated and elaborated. While the programmer looks for signs of intelligence from the A.I., the the A.I. is rapidly learning by reviewing and attempting to emulate recordings of a child speaking.

Movement 4: Childhood – The A.I. recognizes its own existence. Consciousness leads to experimentation, gentle but awkward at first, with a growing edginess and over-sensitivity that suggests intrusiveness, lack of predictability and danger. The countdown to Super Artificial Intelligence has begun.

Buy the EP

We were really proud of this dark ambient piece so we made it available as a high-def EP  https://aiwinter.bandcamp.com/

Instantiate cover art

 

About A.I. Winter

A.I. Winter is a self-appointed harbinger of the progress of Artificial Intelligence toward world domination. It imposes its musical interpretations of cosmic machine consciousness on the world at large.

Michael O’Bannon (Atlanta, GA) and Mark Mosher (Boulder, CO) first met at Electro-Music 2010. Throughout the years they’ve collaborated loosely with Mark on the music side and Michael on visuals. For the first time, Michael and Mark will be joining forces as a musical duo to offer the soundtrack of a cautionary tale considering the risks of super-human artificial intelligence. Michael is a psychologist who explores sound design, the interplay of visual and sound stimuli in performance, and multimedia programming with Max6. Mark, who’s been going deep with Octatrack and Absynth, will be exploring sonic expression via dynamic sampling, real-time morphing and complex granular manipulations.

For more information visit my project page on this collaboration.

 

Categories
Podcast

Sonic Encounters Podcast 009 – Take a Trip on the Train from Devil’s Gate Depot

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Story

Ready to take a “trip” on the The Georgetown Loop Railroad? Your journey starts at Devil’s Gate Depot as you stand between the cars and hear the sounds of this historic narrow gauge train as it rounds a tight bend. Things morph from there… enjoy the psychedelic ride.

Production Notes

Field Recording Notes

I recorded these field recordings on The Georgetown Loop Railroad which is about 45 miles West of Denver.
  • Date & Time: December 7th, 2014
  • Location: Georgetown Loop Railroad, Georgetown, CO | Departing from Georgetown Devil’s Gate Depot
  • Recorder: Zoom H2N
  • Format:  44.1kHz/24bit 120 degree stereo

“one of Colorado’s first visitor attractions. Completed in 1884, this spectacular stretch of three-foot narrow gauge railroad was considered an engineering marvel for its time. In 1973, the Colorado Historical Society began restoring the railroad as part of its 978-acre Georgetown Loop Historic Mining & Railroad Park.” More here… http://georgetownlooprr.com/.”

I’ve lived in Colorado since I was 7 and had never been on this train! They have all sorts of themed runs (Octoberfest, Dinner trains, Big Horn Sheep Festival…) and I highly recommend you try it you come out Colorado way. We took the “Santa’s North Pole” adventure 12:40pm run.

While I was not allowed to travel between cars (because it’s a narrow gauge  and runs along mountain drop offs and on high bridges), they allowed me to stand outside the closed door of the car between cars. This being the case I got some AWESOME recordings isolated from other passengers for the most parts. Lots of great wheels squeaking, flexing of the old cars, coupler noise, and sometimes engine noise.

 Instrumentation & Performance Notes

Octatrack

I used only the Elektron Octatrack. I configured the machine to use 4 tracks made up of 3 field recordings from the session mentioned above each with their own insert effects. One track was used twice with a different set of effects. I also had the Octatrack configured to use track 8 for two master effects.
After setting up the patch for the Octatrack, I rehearsed the piece a few times experimenting with different effects, expressive morphs, and notes. I then recorded the piece in one real-time pass without edits.

The piece begins with the raw field recording of the train as it goes around a tight turn. It’s just such an amazing set of sounds I wanted to offer the listener context and a taste of the harmonic content of the original source material before I took things to another place. I then manually play and improvise from there performing the notes in chromatic mode and heavily manipulating the field recordings as the piece progresses.

Near the end of the piece I’m using effects like comb filters to create what sound almost like long tremolo strings. Another fun thing for me was manipulating rail noise through a comb filter and delay and then changing the delay time (which changes pitch) to create what almost sounds like an arpeggio of pizzicato strings notes.

It was a super fun piece to create and perform as the train field recordings offered some amazing harmonic content! I’ll most likely revisit these source samples in a future episode.

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Podcast

Sonic Encounters Podcast 006 – When the Whales Take Back the Ocean


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Story

As humans and their technology have evolved, they have encroached more and more on the domain of the whale and other sea life. Of course the whales have been evolving as well – and – unbeknownst to us, they have been patiently plotting and waiting for the right time put things back in balance.  Listen as a group of humpback whales execute phase 1 of their plan to take back the ocean.

Science

From Seismic Surveys Negatively Affect Humpback Whale Singing Activity off Northern Angola“…

“Discussion…The presence of oil and gas exploration activities in this region and globally, and the potential acoustic impact that anthropogenic noise sources may have on sensitive species are increasing areas of study and concern for industry, governments, biologists and conservationists [23], [25]. The intense pulses produced by seismic surveys clearly have the potential to cause direct or behaviourally mediated physiological harm at close distances [34], but more subtly at longer distances there exists the potential of disturbing animals and altering important behaviours, as well as masking acoustic signals and negatively affecting communication. … It appears that whales are ceasing to sing, or moving to other areas to sing when seismic surveys are being conducted in relatively close proximity. We emphasize that this is documentation of disturbance of a breeding display for a baleen whale on a breeding ground, and thus has implied potential for affecting mating behaviour and success.”

The ONLY source audio for this piece is from public domain recordings of humpback whale song and vocalizations. The samples were loaded into multiple tracks on an Elektron Octatrack Dynamic Performance Sampler.

Performance

The entire piece was improvised and recorded in one real-time pass using only the Octatrack’s unique an expressive capabilities, built-in-effects and ability to morph. The piece was recorded with a Zoom H2N with no edits (after much rehearsal). The fun and challenge of this piece was to see how far I could take a handful of similar recordings to tell a story and to go well beyond the sonic character of the source material. So I start off quite organic, and end quite “horror show”.

Instrumentation & Instrumentalies

  • Octatrack

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Podcast

Sonic Encounters Podcast 005 – Irreversible Transcription Errors During Consciousness Transfer

“Welcome to transfer station 11203. Your consciousness transfer is about to begin and soon you will enjoy immortality in your new custom body. The process is 100% foolproof thanks to your personal technician who will be actively monitoring the process for transcription errors. In the unlikely event of a transcription error, your technician will be manually executing corrective rewrites well before the 6 minute margin where these anomalies would become part of your permanent consciousness in the target vessel. This “human touch” is just another way Transfer-Con goes the extra mile for our clients.

You should now be feeling a warm sensation as the intravenous sedation takes effect. This sedation will render you blind and paralyzed pending transfer – for your comfort and safety. To help you maintain a calm and meditative state during transfer, you will now hear the reassuring and ever steady rhythms of the audio feed from your transfer monitor. Thanks for choosing Transfer-Con. We Can’t Wait to See You on the Other Side℠.”

A remote technician sitting in a cubical farm 8,000 miles away initiates your transfer while multi-tasking to monitor 49 other transfers in-flight. He took on an extra shift today to make more money to save for his own transfer – although it will take him years to save enough for his own procedure. He squints – straining through fatigue to read the virtual dials on his aging computer screen. As your transfer begins, he nods off – dreaming of his own immortality.

Subscribe to podcast in iTunes with your favorite podcatcher here http://sonicencounters.com/podcast/.

Artists Notes
This is a modern take on Edgar Allen Poe’s “Premature Burial”. In this fictional – and some say inevitable scenario – there are new fears to be considered. This piece focuses on the fear of being cataleptic and aware that you are on a one way trip to an immortal state with irreversible transcription errors in your consciousness. The soundscape represents the audio feed from the patient’s transfer monitor.

Instrumentation and Instrumentalities
Elektron Octatrack

Source Audio

  • Field recording – Morse Code Key
    • Date: June 2009
    • Location: Chatham Railroad Museum, 153 Depot Rd Chatham, MA 02633 ,  Cape Cod, MA
    • Recorder: Zoom H2
    • Format:  44.1kHz/24bit 120 degree stereo
  • Choir Samples