Categories
(Modulate This) ableton live 10 Ableton Live Packs Modular Synthesizers

Ableton Releases CV Tools + View Mind Map Summary + Links to How-To Videos from Moog Demo Library

Heads up, Ableton just released a free set of Max for Live devices called CV Tools. In this post I’ll offer some info on overview videos, a summary mind map I made to give you a one-page perspective on all this, links to a collection of videos just released on Moog’s Demo Library YouTube Channel, and lastly a link for more info and how to get CV Tools.

Overview

Intro video from Ableton

Now you can control your modular and CV-based gear with Ableton Live 10 Suite. And because you own Ableton Live 10 and Max for Live, CV Tools is free for you.

CV Tools is a Pack of 10 devices that allows you to send and modulate control voltage between your modular setup and Ableton Live using a compatible dc-coupled audio interface.

Plus, the included Rotating Rhythm Generator and CV Utility devices give you modular-style workflows inside Live or with a hardware setup that doesn’t use CV-based equipment.

Mind Map Summary of CV Tools

I used mindmeister to create a summary mind map. It’s a rather large map so you may want to click here to view the interactive mind map version. You can see more of my public mind maps here BTW https://www.mindmeister.com/users/channel/103187.

Click here to view the interactive mind map version

Moog Demo Videos

To see CV tools in action and learn more about how to use them swing by the Moog Demo Library Channel on YouTube. Bonus to see these tools in action with Push 2.

More Info and Download Link for CV Tools

You will need to be running the free Live 10.1 update or above to use it. Download CV Tools from the Packs page or find it in your Live Browser under Available Packs.

Download CV Tools and get more info here
https://www.ableton.com/en/packs/cv-tools/.

Categories
(Modulate This) Ableton Live ableton live 10 Ableton Live Packs Modular Modular Synthesis Modular Synthesizers

Ableton Releases CV Tools + View Mind Map Summary + Links to How-To Videos from Moog Demo Library

Heads up, Ableton just released a free set of Max for Live devices called CV Tools. In this post I’ll offer some info on overview videos, a summary mind map I made to give you a one-page perspective on all this, links to a collection of videos just released on Moog’s Demo Library YouTube Channel, and lastly a link for more info and how to get CV Tools.

Overview

Intro video from Ableton

Now you can control your modular and CV-based gear with Ableton Live 10 Suite. And because you own Ableton Live 10 and Max for Live, CV Tools is free for you.

CV Tools is a Pack of 10 devices that allows you to send and modulate control voltage between your modular setup and Ableton Live using a compatible dc-coupled audio interface.

Plus, the included Rotating Rhythm Generator and CV Utility devices give you modular-style workflows inside Live or with a hardware setup that doesn’t use CV-based equipment.

Mind Map Summary of CV Tools

I used mindmeister to create a summary mind map. It’s a rather large map so you may want to click here to view the interactive mind map version. You can see more of my public mind maps here BTW https://www.mindmeister.com/users/channel/103187.

Click here to view the interactive mind map version

Moog Demo Videos

To see CV tools in action and learn more about how to use them swing by the Moog Demo Library Channel on YouTube. Bonus to see these tools in action with Push 2.

More Info and Download Link for CV Tools

You will need to be running the free Live 10.1 update or above to use it. Download CV Tools from the Packs page or find it in your Live Browser under Available Packs.

Download CV Tools and get more info here
https://www.ableton.com/en/packs/cv-tools/.

Categories
(Modulate This) Artistic Practice Darwin Grosse Podcasts Sound Design

Artist Ed Ball Interview on Art + Music + Technology Podcast

I love this interview with artist Ed Ball on Darwin Grosse’s Art + Music + Technology podcast so I wanted to spread the word. I found the story of Ed’s artist journey inspiring and informative. He’s got a great vibe (often hilarious) and interesting perspective on art which I found refreshing.

Listen to the Podcast on Lybsin or on iTunes.

Ed is a contemporary abstract artist who “uses a combination of sonic experiments, music and paint to produce artworks on canvas.”

I directly paint music and sound compositions creating works of art that represent the sound on canvas. This has progressed with me starting to experiment with electronic sound creation myself using unusual electronic equipment with the future vision of painting these sound experiments… https://www.edwardball.co.uk/

Darwin’s show notes…

I first heard from Ed Ball when he reached out with a collaboration concept. I was intrigued, looked further into it – and was pretty blown away. Then I talked to Ed, and was even more drawn in. Ed is killin’ it by “Painting Music”, but in a way that takes direct influence from actual tracks, and has a performative quality that jumps off a canvas.

If you take a look at his paintings (check out https://www.edwardball.co.uk/) and you’ll see what I mean. The work stands on its own, but when you hear Ed’s story, it’s even more interesting. Having Ed describe his passion for sharing fine art is exciting; having him talk about getting an Analogue Solutions Vostok is makes you want to jump to the future. Combining modular synth music with performative painting seems so obvious that I can’t wait to see where it goes.

In addition to everything else, Ed is also a dynamic personality – he immediately draws you into whatever he’s talking about. It made for a great conversation, and I hope you enjoy it as much as I did. Cheers!

Ed also has a YouTube channel which you can check out here https://www.youtube.com/user/Edwardball.

ed ball youtube

___
Mark Mosher
Synthesist & Multimedia Artist

Artist Site: NewEcho.com
Electronic Music Tech & Production Blog:  ModulateThis.com

Categories
In the Lab

Video of First Patch with Reaktor 6 Modular Blocks … And It’s a Krell Patch

krell 001 mm b

In addition to composing and rehearsing, myself and most electronic musicians I know also spend quite a bit of time researching and tweaking their hardware and software rigs. In the last few years I’ve been more inclined to go deeper with narrow set of instruments for my work – both on the hardware and software side of things. Even so, I do spend time researching outside for my normal tool set from time-to-time to keep up with what’s new and sometimes add new instruments to my rig.

Two trends going on around us are the resurgence of analog synthesizers and a rapid growth in the popularity of modular synthesis – especially in the hardware Eurorack format. In laymen terms, Modular synthesis is just that.  The sound designer not the manufacturer gets to decide how the signals flow from module to module. The end results can be very unique, evocative and organic sonic results.

krell 001 mm c

Because I travel to many shows, I’ve gone with software-based modular synthesis. This is also a bit lighter on the wallet ;^) Luckily for me, the bar has been raised on the software side of the house with the release of Reaktor 6, a graphical modular software music studio made by Berlin-based Native Instruments.

The big news is Reaktor 6 has added a new interface called “Blocks” which emulates the metaphor of hardware modulars. I just picked up Reaktor 6 yesterday and thought I’d share a video Reaktor 6 of my first patch in action. My goal was to show how just a few modules with a few notes could create something rather sonically complex to show the potential of the system – and for those not familiar with modulars – the kind of sonic mayhem you can create. So please enjoy this simple but fun patch inspired – of course – by the Krell in the film Forbidden Planet. Who knows, maybe you’ll hear some more Reaktor 6 modular action in upcoming Sonic Encounters podcasts episodes.

 

For fellow electronic music artists that read this blog I’m using the Monark oscillator (now available in Block form) to frequency modulating a a factory Bento box oscillator. I’ve got an LFO modulating an LFO which modulates the pitch of Monark OSC + delay time of a Rounds Delay (also now available in Blocks form). If you are familiar at all with modular synthesis, you’ll find Blocks to be very intuitive and inspiring – and much easier to make instruments from from than using only the techniques possible in Reaktor 5.

I’ll close by saying I’ve also started beta testing another modular system based on wireless Percussa AudioCubes. It’s a fascinating take on modular synthesis using smart blocks and infrared. Watch for some posts on this as I get further along.

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